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Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> the asteroid is a small blip on this nasa feed on these -- at the space museum. it came within 17,000 miles of earth. >> it is incredible. it makes me think the government to blastep funding how things, maybe. >> all of these made us wonder, ?hat if, you know, on a house >> the insurance agents says you good,-be deductible. -- the insurance agent says you minus the deductible. >> it is something to think about it your home gets struck meteor. nasa says there were no worries the act asteroid. weighed asin russia as the eiffel tower. >> pretty incredible. also tonight, we are hearing more horrifying stories on what a true nightmare at sea. 44 lines of people on board the c --val cruise -- crews carnival cruise ship triumph are back home. we have stories of survival and recovery.ional >> a long recovery, but closer to the end. newsands of arrived in orleans. thinkingthey will be sleeping in warm beds. the end of a voyage they had anticipating for days. >> we only had an hour-and-a- half to sleep. be going home. >> a fire breaks out in the ship's engine room. the ship started drifting in the gu
nasa. it was more of a member is of and a from his sons couple close friends. the eulogies were mostly about his humility. that is what i remember most about neil. one of the most humble guys i ever met, most self-effacing, never bragged. never thought about looked at me, i am first on the moon. and it probably the most talented guy i knew as far as pilot skills go. >> you were if prior -- you were a fighter pilot. >> right, and so was he, in korea. then he got out of the navy. so he was an accomplished pilot when he came to nasa. i think if anybody should have been first on the moon, it was neil armstrong because he had the skill and the humility to carry that load. >> we talked last night at dinner. when you were flying at the lunar module down, commander is on one side and the other guy is on the other side. it makes it easier for one person to get out first. talked-about -- talk about that. >> who's gonna be first out? the lunar module pilot is on the right side as the face forward. the commander is on the left side. and you are standing. it takes a couple hours to get to take up -
to watch these things. and nasa has a near-earth program. it is, i would argue, it is underfunded because of what's at stake here both in the sense of preparedness and dealing with injury and upset. but as to deal with international incidents that might occur. you mentioned the 2002 meteorite over the mediterranean, at the time, the deputy director said if this would have happened over the subcontinent it might have been mistaken for a nuclear explosion in this belligerent stand off between india and pakistan at the time. there are certainly occasions back in the soviet days when the united states and russia mistook natural occurrences for what might have been belligerent events. and so, you have to watch these things. and the nasa near-earth program is important for all of those reasons. as you pointed out, as your other guest pointed out, the energy that's contained in just say small rock, you know, a foot across or a couple of feet across, traveling at these velocities can pack a lot of energy. so when it explodes, it's as if a nuclear explosion went off. obviously, not the radiation a
apparently unfounded. nasa is using radar and other technology to study how the asteroid behaves, including its rotation rate, its composition and how it's impacted by the earth's gravity. the idea is to learn enough to prevent cat as it sfroe fee from it threatening in the future. >> we're going to get a lot of information about the asteroid. we're interested in its future motion, whether or not it could come back, whether it threatens the earth. >> reporter: the odds are either this one or another will be back. an asteroid impact the earth about every 120 years on average. it will be visible in the rthernemisphere this evening if you have access to a telescope. for now it's on its way away from the earth out into outer space harmlessly rotating -- or resolving -- excuse me. harmlessly rotating -- i can't even think of the right word. orbiting the sun. harmlessly at least for now, jim. >> casey, thanks very much. we appreciate it. ? or gal lat particular news, a meteor lit up the skies over eastern russia. the blinding light was followed by a series of deafening explosions. listen to this.
. bill: according to nasa, 100 tons of meet toors of gravel and dust hit the atmosphere and the earth every single day. the smaller strikes what we saw in russia happen ten times a year. that's new. scientists believe a strike by a meteor six miles across may have been responsible for extinction of the dinosaurs 66 million years ago. in case you're wondering on a friday have something to do over the weekend you mentioned the asteroid talking about past several days. they say there is no connection between that and this meteor. we'll talk to scientists throughout the morning. heather: a lot of experts. bill: meantime, six minutes past, the nightmare is finally over. what a slow crawl this was. thousands of passengers cheering the end of a cruise ship horror scene. touching land and kissing it like the pope. the carnival cruise triumph docking last night in mobile after putting what passengers through what they call disgusting conditions. now they say they are just happy to be home. who can blame them. >> i feel great to be off the ship and just being on land and, i get to see my family
damaged, and more than a million square feet of glass shattered the size of 20 football fields. nasa says it's the biggs meteor to hit the earth in more than 100 years. one piece is believed to created a huge hole in this frozen lake. drivers are searching for fragments. meteor hunters would like to get their hands on a piece of the rofnlgt it could be pretty valuable, depending hundred big it is. >> there's no doubt that millions and million of dollars in value, pieces, fell to the earth. >> hours after the meteor hit russia, scientists said the asteroid missed the earth by only 17,000 miles, coming closer than satellites and late friday night, fire ball lit up the sky over san francisco. it turn out to be a meteor or shooting star, nothing to do with the one in russia. >> ama: new at 11:00, an east bay man suffered only minor cuts after losing control of his brand new motorcycle and slamming into a house. the incident happened in antioch this evening. police said the man was on his driveway, doing some sort of maneuver with the bike, when he lost control. the 2013 harley davidson smashe
cold. nasa estimates the meteor exploded with the force of at least 20 hiroshima atomic bombs. >> it could have probably leveled every single building in an area the size of chicago. >> reporter: local officials say the explosion injured more than 1,000 people and caused about 33 million in damage. cameras captured the meteor in the sky over russia. now crews are trying to find fragments in a leg about 50 miles from chelyabinsk. scientists say an event of this magnitude happens about once every 100 years, but they say it's not uncommon for meteors to impact the planet more often. >> we are hit by about 100 tons of space debris every day. >> reporter: the explosion in russia and an asteroid that just missed earth has people looking up. late friday, some in the san francisco bay area reported seeing a fireball streaking through the sky. experts say it was likely another meteor, but that the three events are unrelated. tatiana anderson for cbs news. >>> it's a mistake they won't make again. the crafty way a couple tracked down their stolen
that provide cell phone service. you can track it beginning at 2:00 this afternoon. log on to nasa's live stream to take a look. >> a nightmare for many. it's finally over as the carnival triumph crew ships was pushed back into port overnight. >> it docked in mobile alabama after being stranded at sea for several days. now passengers are making their way home. let's check in with brianne carter in a satellite center with more from a local passenger who was on the ship, giving us more perspective on the conditions. >> imagine the emotions, finally being able to get off the cruise ship. one local woman tried to stay positive and is excited to be headed back to arlington. some passengers say even though they finally have docked, there was more drama because they have to wait hours before they could finally get on land. waving and cheering, thousands onboard a carnival cruise ship stuck at see for days, they celebrated as they finally docked. >> after being on that boat for that long and not knowing how we were getting back, it's so good to be back. but there were a lot of unhappy people on t
well is the world prepared? nasa budgeted $20 million last year to look for objects that may hit the earth, but scientists say that more money should be spent on detection and ways to avoid possible collision. >> we have gone very good at finding the big things, of kilometre-size objects. there are many more small objects, like these, then there are the big ones. >> i would say the corporate technology to reflect an asteroid could be a nuclear bomb. the key is catching and detecting the obvious early. >> experts say friday's blast could have killed thousands of people had the mir landed in the middle of a large city, all -- a reminder that smaller objects coming into earth's atmosphere should be a wake-up call. >> we know we live in a celestial falling rocks zone. friday reminded us that we live in a shooting gallery. in fact, we got into a cross fire. >> the power of the universe on display here on earth. wbal tv 11 news. >> the sky is falling. it is wild. the maryland turks upset -- terps upset duke, the incredible win had fans charging onto the court. >>, chicken sav buying on
bomb, injuring more than 1,000 people, mostly from broken glass. n.a.s.a. said the meteor was about the size of a building and moving at 40,000 miles per hour. >> the recent occurrences is probably what makes it interesting. it's definitely what has we up here. >> what do you know about astroids? >> i know they can be dangerous. >> meanwhile another astroid is passing very close to the earth. it's the closest any astroid has ever gotten to the earth. stargazers came out to get a glimpse of a fuzzy dot on a video screen. 17,000 miles seems like a long distance, but it's so close the earth that astronomers see hits gravity has the potential of pending it's path. >> astronomers say it's a wonderful coincidence. reporting from the space and science center in oakland, i'm allen wong, abc7 news. >> if you snapped a picture of last night's meteor, we would love to see it. just send it to us. u report at kgo-tv.com. >> it's certainly unlikely that a meteor would ever hit your home, but if it did, are you covered by an insurance? michael finney got some answers. >> it is one of the things de
, they were still there. go look it the web site on nasa. you can see every landing site. if anybody does not believe we ever went to the moon, does go look at that. >> charlie, it's funny. i met you in texas. i did not know this but you were the guy who had some very famous words as apollo 11 was going through its trials and tribulations. talk about that. you are part of history for that. >> i was very fortunate to have been involved in five of the nine missions be sent to the moon. -- missions we sent to the moon. i started with apollo 10. it was not designed to land. i helped develop the procedures to activate the lunar module. i was in michigan told talking to them when they started this -- i was in mission control when i started talking to them when they started the dissent. that was a dress rehearsal for apollo 11 terry the first time we going to attempt the landing on the moon. neil armstrong asked me to do the same job for them on apollo 11. two months, we had to get ready. we modified the procedure somewhat. then we were ready to go. so i was in mission control of the dissent. as
. an engineering grad student and former member of the nasa student ambassador program. his family says green had a mental illness. >> the family let our detectives know that this suspect had this condition for at least a year. and that in the past, he had been prescribed medication for this mental illness. >> reporter: this happened around 1:00 this morning at a rental house close by the college park campus. police say that green set fires in and around the house in an apparent effort to draw his roommates outside. when the two room mates came out, they say green opened fire. he killed one and wounded another and then turned the gun on himself. >> around 1:00 a.m. we heard about ten shots fired. and we couldn't figure out if it was gunshots or firecrackers. >> reporter: police say that the gun green used he purchased legally. apparently after he was diagnosed with mental illness. and in addition to the murder weapon police say green also had a bag containing a baseball bat. a machete. a loaded semiautomatic weapon, and? extra ammunition. so sad this scene the university president came to the nei
to nasa's jet propulsion laboratory, where they're keeping a close eye on what's going on. >> wolf, we're inside the deep space network operation center at the jet propulsion laboratory at nasa's facility in pasadena, california. it's at the jet propulsion lab, where nasa will be monitoring that asteroid. it's called 2012 da-14, because it was discovered last year. that's an artist rendering of it, but they're going to be looking at the real thing when it passes very close to earth on friday, mid-day. it's going to pass within about 17,200 miles of earth. that's a lot closer than the moon is to the earth. it's also within the satellite ring. about 5,000 miles within the ring of satellites that hover above the earth's surface. what can we really expect from that asteroid has it passes close to earth? i'm here with paul, a research astronomer with nasa's near-earth object program. paul, let's get this out of the way. does this threaten earth? is it going to impact earth? >> no, we've been tracking this closely for a year and we know it will not hit the earth. >> what about the satellites
? >> nasa has a program to search for these objects and we've done a good job at finding the large ones. we put the priority on finding the large one first. the one that hit on friday was really a tiny asteroid, pretty small. >> anna: it's wild that this tiny one caused this much damage. you say mostly what you're looking for are the ones that are 400 feet in size and up, right? >> yes. a city block and larger. those are ones that would reach the surface. the one that hit over russia was broken up by the atmosphere. so there was only the damage from the shock wave. the larger ones, if they reach the surface in one piece, can cause great damage. >> peter: when you talk about the larger ones, what are we talking about? something as big as a kilometer? do those exist? >> oh, yes. oh, yes. and that's about a half mile. nasa has done a good job of finding 95% of those ones. the idea is to find them many, many years before they could hit the earth and calculate when and where the hazard is and if there is a hazard sometime in the future, then we could possibly do something about it. >> steve: now
information about the meteor that exploded on friday. nasa says the meteor was bigger than originally thought. they say the fire ball was 55 feet wide and weighed about 10,000 tons. it was traveling at 40,000 miles per hour when it exploded over siberia. >>> and another milestone for michael jordan. the basketball legend turns 50 today. happy birthday, m.j. >>> that was the pope this morning speaking from his window at the vatican while thousands of people gathered at st. peteers square. this is the pope's second to last sunday before retirement. the pope announced last week he is stepping down by the end of the month. anne thompson with more ont that. >> reporter: more than 50,000 people came to hear the pope. that is double the size of last week's crowd. he spoke to them in six different languages thanking them for their prayers and support and added in his native german that these were difficult days and the crowd in turn responded with respect and affection. in rome where there is no shortage of must-see attractions suddenly elderly pope benedict is number one on everyone's list. today he
.s.-based telescopes to get a good look. but in australia some imagery is available and coming in thanks to nasa. as for a direct hit, well, astronomers worldwide are watching, they're excited but not worried. this asteroid's about half a football field long or roughly the size of a 12-story building like this. that certainly is big enough to wipe out a city, but scientists say at least today that is not going to happen. the real threat, though small, is to communications satellites like the ones we at fox news use. the geosynchronous plane is 22,000 miles around the earth, and da14 penetrates at 1:24 eastern, just a little more than an hour from now, coming 17,000 miles from earth, exiting at 3:24. satellite companies have been warned. they do not expect any satellite will actually be hit though. with about a million asteroids and meteors flying around earth's orbit, astronomers and telescopes around the planet are constantly looking up. >> we've seen and trackedded about 9,000 of them right now, and about a thousand of them are potentially hazardous. so we look at those carefully, and it turns
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)